MA Inspired: Knowing Your Self Worth By Mariam Adeyemi Timmer

Self-worth can be said to be the sense of one’s own value or worth as a person. Self-worth is believing in ourselves. Self-worth comes from a source on the INSIDE of us. We create it through Faith, by acting on the singular belief that we matter. Self-worth is the foundation of our ability to believe in ourselves.

Self-worth should be less about measuring yourself based on external actions and more about valuing your inherent worth as a person. In other words, self-worth is about who you are, not about what you do or what you have achieved so far.

 

This statement is quite a contrast to what our contemporary society today wants us to believe. There are quite a number of people who thread this path laid down by the society and tend to believe that Self-worth is based on external factors. Studies have now shown that basing one’s self-worth on external factors is harmful to one’s mental health. According to a research conducted at the University of Michigan, it was found that college students who base their self-worth on external sources (including academic performance, appearance, and approval from others) reported more stress, anger, academic problems and relationship conflicts. They also had higher levels of alcohol and drug use, as well as more symptoms of eating disorders. The same study found that students who based their self-worth on internal sources, not only felt better, they also received higher grades and were less likely to use drugs and alcohol or to develop eating disorders.

Comparing ourselves to others means to always be fighting a losing battle. Take into account the unique things that make YOU.

Although success and accomplishments are important to acknowledge as you build your sense of self, your self-worth should also take into account the fact that you are a man’s life or should I say worth does not consist in a number of things which he possesses.

 

To build self-worth, your attitude towards yourself matters a lot. Stop putting yourself down, how you perceive yourself eventually becomes the reality of you. Whilst doing that be careful not to exaggerate and overemphasize yourself otherwise you will appear egotistical and arrogant. If you are used to beating down on yourself, start challenging that critical inner voice. This internalized dialogue of critical thoughts or “inner voices” undermines our sense of self-worth and even leads to self-destructive or maladaptive behaviors, which make us feel even worse about ourselves.

 

Next, you need to learn to trust your feelings. Do not allow other make decisions for you that concerns you. Try not to give the incentive to people that you will respond to what they want. I catch the slightest whiff of that, they will swarm in like a drone of bees and take maximum advantage of that.

Analyze yourself and stop making self-worth conditional upon people. Do not try to live up to an image of what you think others want you to be. Give yourself realistic pep talks. Tell yourself that you matter and start taking responsibility for your actions, reactions, and attitude. As Eleanor Roosevelt once said, “no one can make you feel inferior without your consent,” and that is the crux of poor self-worth.

Value yourself irrespective of your worth and earnings because if you do not respect and value yourself no one else will

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